AMS Kick-start projects visible in the city

The three AMS kick-start projects, which are looking for practical solutions for daily life in the city, are becoming increasingly visible in Amsterdam. In the spring, Urban Mobility Lab is planning to conduct an experiment investigating traffic streams around Arena Boulevard during a football match. Rain Sense is working to realise an Urban Weather Sensing lab in vicinity of Wibautstraat (the ‘Knowledge Mile’). Daniel Goedbloed of Waternet: ‘We are working with residents to map flooding down to the street level.’

For the residents of Amsterdam
The kick-start projects are looking for practical solutions for daily life in the city. They are part of the AMS research portfolio, and they meet the criteria specified for this purpose: partners of AMS Institute are involved, the research is relevant to and useful for the residents of Amsterdam and the projects are innovative on a global level.

The ‘urban metabolism’
Urban Pulse is studying the current flow patterns of energy, water, food and materials: the ‘urban metabolism’. A fresh approach can relieve pressure on the environment and help to prevent shortages of these essential elements. Urban Pulse is now mapping flow patterns in order to compare them to those of other cities, in the Netherlands and internationally. The results can provide a base for conclusions concerning the sustainability of Amsterdam.

Resilient to water
Rain Sense is making Amsterdam more resilient to flooding. Daniel Goedbloed from the partner organisation Waternet explains: ‘We are working with residents to map flooding using an app. The charting goes all the way down to street level – a feature unique to this project. We are also using other smart innovations, including measurement stations on lampposts and umbrellas that serve as mobile rain meters. With the combined data, Waternet will soon be able to take preventive measures in a timely manner.’ Rain Sense is now working to realise a lab on Wibautstraat, and it will be conducting a test with residents this summer.

New types of transport
Urban Mobility Lab analyses and predicts traffic streams. This is not easy in a metropolis like Amsterdam: traffic and transport are the result of millions of major and minor decisions: Shall I go by car, or shall I take the tram? Shall I walk? Where shall I live, and where shall I work? Urban Mobility Lab collaborates with the government, companies and residents to discover new, cleaner and more reliable forms of transport. In the spring, Urban Mobility Lab is planning to conduct an experiment on Arena Boulevard during a football match. It will generate data on traffic streams, collected from various sources and measuring devices. These data could be used in further research on better and safer mobility solutions in the future.