AMS ALLEGRO

with innovative data to a new theory for pedestrians and bicycles

The ALLEGRO project covers five years of research with a group of 8 PhD students and 3 postdocs under the lead of prof. Serge Hoogendoorn (Delft University of Technology and PI Mobility at AMS Institute). A major challenge in contemporary traffic and transportation theory is having a comprehensive understanding of pedestrians and cyclists behaviour. Different behavioural levels, concerning walking and cycling operations, activity scheduling and travel behaviour and knowledge representation and learning will be covered. Major scientific breakthroughs are expected at each of these levels, in terms of theory and modelling, and by using innovative big data collection and experimentation.

A major challenge in contemporary traffic and transportation theory is having a comprehensive understanding of pedestrians and cyclists behaviour. This is notoriously hard to observe, while sensors providing abundant and detailed information about this behaviour have not been available until very recently. The behaviour is also far more complex than that of the car drivers, due to for instance the many degrees of freedom in decision-making, the interactions among pedestrians and cyclists that are more involved and far less guided by traffic rules and regulations than those between car-drivers, and the many fascinating but complex phenomena in active traffic flows, that are very hard to predict accurately. This also leads to a lack of accurate simulation models, and tools to support planning, design, management and control. With active modes gaining ground in terms of mode share, in many cities the societal problem becomes visible as well: examples of major accidents due to bad planning, organisation and management of events are manifold, as are locations where safety of active modes is a serious issue due to interactions with fast modes.

Prof. Serge Hoogendoorn has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant for five-year research into traffic theory for pedestrians and cyclists. The Advanced Grant is a grant for up to 2.5 million euros from the European Research Council for excellent, established researchers carrying out innovative and ground-breaking research. The research programme is called unrAvelLing sLow modE travelinG and tRaffic – with innOvative data to a new transportation and traffic theory for pedestrians and bicycles. Its aim is to establish a comprehensive theory of active mode behaviour, considering the different behavioural levels for pedestrians and cyclists in cities. These behavioural levels deal with walking and cycling operations, activity scheduling and travel behaviour, and knowledge representation and learning. Major scientific breakthroughs are expected at each of these levels, in terms of theory and modelling, by using innovative big data collection and experimentation, analysis and fusion techniques, including social media data analytics, use augmented reality, remote and crowd sensing.

The research is divided in three research themes, reflecting the theoretical, methodological or engineering nature. Theme I (“Transportation and Traffic Flow Theory for Slow Modes in an Urban Context”) is at the heart of the proposal, and focuses on the behavioural fundamentals for the active mode traffic operations, activity-travel behaviour, and network knowledge acquisition and retention. To enable this study, the second theme “Slow Mode Urban Mobility Laboratory” (SM-UML) is identified, providing the required laboratory facilities and toolbox (in terms of data, data processing tools, open modelling and simulation platform, etc.). Finally, the “Theory and Laboratory Applications” theme shows two key applications of the newly developed theories, models, etc. The latter will focus on fundamental knowledge in the engineering and design fields. Each theme will consist of multiple research projects, see the figure below. Each box in the diagram reflects one PhD or PD project, which leads to a total research group consisting of 8 PhD students (light grey boxes) and 3 postdocs (dark grey boxes).

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Project duration: 1 November 2015 – 1 November 2020

Partners: Delft University of Technology

Project leader:
Prof.dr.ir. Serge Paul Hoogendoorn, professor at department of Transport & Planning, faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology and PI Mobility at AMS Institute
Phone: +31 (0)15 278 9341
Email: s.p.hoogendoorn@tudelft.nl

Contact person(s):
Prof.dr.ir. Serge Paul Hoogendoorn, professor at department of Transport & Planning, faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology and PI Mobility at AMS Institute
Phone: +31 (0)15 278 9341
Email: s.p.hoogendoorn@tudelft.nl

Dr.ir. Winnie Daamen, associate professor at department of Transport & Planning, faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology
Phone: +31 (0)15 278 5927
Email: w.daamen@tudelft.nl