Due to the rapid acceleration of urbanization, cities like Amsterdam will face logistic challenges in the future. A piece of this logistical puzzle is to utilize the existing waterways with autonomous vessels, which can alleviate the stress on the roads in the city. Amsterdam is the perfect test environment for Roboat to make this a reality.

Jonathan is part of the Roboat team, where he helps build the software stack of the project. His main objective is to realize the software behind autonomous navigation on the urban waterways. Together with his teammates, he regularly goes out on the waters of the Marineterrein, to test and validate the improvements they make to Roboats software.

Jonathan graduated in mechanical engineering at TU Delft, with a specialization in control systems. During his time as a student, he was part of exoskeleton student team Project MARCH, where he led the Software & Control team for a year. This made him realize his passion lies less in the hardware, but more in the software side of robotics.

After an exciting day of work, Jonathan can often be found on the beach volleyball field. When not on the court, he loves to cook three course meals for his friends and tinker around with DIY projects.

“Roboat has the potential to solve all sorts of problems in cities. Being able to contribute to that is awesome.”

Jonathan Klein Schiphorst

Robotics software engineer

Project

Roboat

Smart Urban Mobility

Amsterdam gets world’s first fleet of autonomous boats.

Project

Roboat

Smart Urban Mobility

Amsterdam gets world’s first fleet of autonomous boats.

Project

Roboat

Smart Urban Mobility

Amsterdam gets world’s first fleet of autonomous boats.