Sanda Lenzholzer studied landscape architecture at the Leibniz University Hannover (Dipl. Ing.) and Housing and Urbanism at the Architectural Association School in London (MA). After that she was a designer associated with various agencies in the Netherlands and Germany (e.g. Sant & Co, Mecanoo, ST Freiraum). Since 2004 she has been working at Wageningen University and specialized in the relationship between research and design and especially climate-oriented urban and landscape design. Through her research projects (e.g. Climate Proof Cities, Climadaptool, REALCOOL, SOLOCLIM) she contributes to improving the knowledge base of climate-oriented urban design. Since 2020 she leads the landscape architecture group of Wageningen University. In the recent past her focus shifted towards a broader approach that integrates different fields into the design of public spaces. She publishes widely, advises design agencies, municipalities and provinces, and gives guest lectures and master classes in many countries.

The biggest challenge for Amsterdam is to deal with climate change and safeguard a livable future for the city. Her work on integrated design of public spaces with special attention to climate adaptation contributes to reaching these aims.

Look here for more information about the projects.

“We do not only have to design the urban landscape, but also its soilscape, waterscape and airscape.”

Sanda Lenzholzer

Full professor Landscape Architecture & AMS PI

Project

REALCOOL

Climate Resilient Cities

Surging heat levels in the city prompted Amsterdam’s decision makers and research talent further to look for climate proofing solutions. Research hand in hand with design presented prototypes using water to cool the city.

Project

REALCOOL

Climate Resilient Cities

Surging heat levels in the city prompted Amsterdam’s decision makers and research talent further to look for climate proofing solutions. Research hand in hand with design presented prototypes using water to cool the city.

Project

REALCOOL

Climate Resilient Cities

Surging heat levels in the city prompted Amsterdam’s decision makers and research talent further to look for climate proofing solutions. Research hand in hand with design presented prototypes using water to cool the city.