This year, Dutch Design Week (DDW) takes place both virtually and 'live' in Eindhoven. With an extensive program of talkshows, videos, articles and more, where to start?

Our community of experts take part in 'Up Close & Personal' talkshows and videos, showcase our Smart Urban Mobility projects at 'the Embassy of Mobility', and spark online discussions on how to design resilient urban food systems hosted by Frame. This 2021 edition of DDW you can find us here:

Up Close & Personal

Next to launching an e-magazine to inspire you with numerous design-related innovations, Up Close & Personal aims to fuel the discussion on Dutch design research by the four technical universities in The Netherlands (4TU). Therefore, the platform organizes daily debates that are hosted by Isolde Hallensleben. And, being closely connected to both WUR and TU Delft, AMS Institute contributes to the program of Up close and Personal with several innovative projects.

This year's discussions are centered around the following themes: Entangled Ecologies, Connected Interactions, Changing Things, Embedded Designers, and Evolving Methodologies. Curious what role design plays with regard to these themes?

October 18 | Climate resilience & Moss-covered walls | Online talkshow

With regard to the Entangled Interactions theme, Up Close & Personal showcases how design materials create new entanglements and lead to unforeseen results. Think about some of the challenges our cities face: heat stress, water retention and air pollution. What if moss-covered walls can be part of the solution to make cities climate resilient?

At Marineterrein Amsterdam Living Lab, the TU Delft startup Respyre experiments if "moss walls" can help make our cities cooler and more livable. This Dutch Design Week, Auke Bleij - Business and Technology Developer at Respyre - will be a speaker in the Up Close & Personal talkshow on October 18th from 15:00-16:00. For more information about his talk, check out the e-magazine >>

Can "moss walls" make cities climate resilient?

Moss potentially offers a solution for many urban challenges at once. Among others, it cools the environment, absorbs CO₂ and particulate matter, is soundproof, stimulates biodiversity, and retains water. Also, it insulates the buildings on which it grows, reducing the need for electricity for air conditioning in the summer.

A sample of moss

Moss potentially offers a solution for many urban challenges at once. Among others, it cools the environment, absorbs CO₂ and particulate matter, is soundproof, stimulates biodiversity, and retains water. Also, it insulates the buildings on which it grows, reducing the need for electricity for air conditioning in the summer.

“If we can demonstrate that moss walls positively contribute to enhancing urban liveablity, it can also become interesting for project developers and social rental sector alike.”

Auke Bleij | Business and Technology Developer | Respyre

October 19 | Responsible Sensing Lab | Online talkshow & Expo

Up Close & Personal's second theme 'Connected Interactions' brings home the idea that interacting with something can be meaningful for a particular time and place or can be alien to it, has impact on other interactions taking place, and can even transcend particular situations, producing effects beyond the local circumstances.

As part of this theme, we showcase our Our Responsible Sensing Lab (RSL) - a collaboration with the City of Amsterdam. In short, RSL explores how to integrate social values in the design of sensing systems in public space. To illustrate, what if cameras are equipped with shutters showing us when the camera ‘sees’ you or not? Among others, the Lab's Shuttercam project explores how the design of cameras in public space can contribute to a ‘responsible’ Smart City.

Responsible Sensing Lab exhibits two prototypes of the projects Shuttercam and Shuttering at at the Upclose & Personal Exhibit in Klokgebouw on Strijp S. Or join us on October 19th from 15:00-16:00 for the talkshow, in which Coen Bergman - Innovation Developer Public Tech at the City of Amsterdam, CTO Innovatieteam will be representing Responsible Sensing Lab is one of the speakers. For more information take a loot at the e-magazine >>

“The ultimate goal is to design cameras that gather only the required type or amount of data necessary for the city to operate or perform the specific task of safeguarding the right of citizens to walk around freely and unobserved.”

Thijs Turèl

Program Manager Responsible Urban Digitization

Project

Responsible Sensing Lab

Responsible Urban Digitization

Our Responsible Sensing Lab explores how to integrate social values in the design of sensing systems in public space.

News

First findings on the Shuttercam sensors

Responsible Urban Digitization

First findings on the Shuttercam sensors

October 19 | Space for Food | Online talkshow

Also with regards to the Connected Interactions theme, we showcase our Space for Food project. This project investigates if space technology can provide circular solutions for cities. In other words: what if we view “cities as spaceships”; in terms of urban environments being ‘closed-loop systems’?

In short, at Marineterrein Amsterdam Living Lab, our researchers examine how we can use space tech developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) in an urban context to extract nutrients and water from wastewater for sustainable food production. And as such, increase circularity in a city like Amsterdam.

Curious about the potential and scalability of this innovation? Join Radu Giurgiu (SEMiLLA) in the talkshow on October 19th from 15:00-16:00, or browse through the e-magazine >>

Project

Space tech for sustainable food systems

Circularity in Urban Regions

Can space technology provide circular solutions for food production in cities?

News

Space technology for circular cities

Circularity in Urban Regions

Can we use this technology to make cities more circular? 'Space for Food' tests this at Marineterrein Amsterdam Living L

The Embassy of Mobility Conference

Mobility is a necessity, not a goal. You depend on it to get the care you need, to get to work, or to relax with your family. Think about this: what if mobility improves people’s well-being and stimulates connection? Or what if mobility positively contributes to the environment? At 'the Embassy of Mobility Conference' we explore the future of mobility.

October 20 | Smart Urban Mobility | Eindhoven

As metropolitan area's continue to grow, so does the number of people that move around. More commuting also means more issues related to traffic such as congestion, crowded streets, and increasing pressures on fragile infrastructures. Cities worldwide face the challenge of finding better ways to design and manage urban mobility.

During Dutch Design Week, between 11:00-18:00, you can find us at the EIT Urban Mobility hub - located within the area of the Embassy of Mobility in the Klokgebouw. Here, our program manager on the topic of Smart Urban Mobility, Tom Kuipers, will be there in light of projects EIT Urban Mobility projects: CityFlows, Code the Streets and Smart Hubs.

Furthermore, during the 'Embassy of Mobility Conference' which starts at 13:30, you are invited to be inspired by a talkshow on 'the future of mobility'.

Project

Code the Streets

Smart Urban Mobility

Code the Street is working on smart solutions for sustainable, inclusive and safe mobility management.

Project

CityFlows

Smart Urban Mobility

Amsterdam, Milan and Barcelona to launch a Crowd Management Decision-Support System to improve the safety and comfort of

“With one of our projects - Code the Streets - we demonstrate how cities, mobility providers/services and knowledge institutes can successfully work together on providing mobility management tools. These collaborations are key to improving livability in urban environments.”

Tom Kuipers

Program Developer Smart Urban Mobility

The Next Space by Frame

During Dutch Design Week, Frame organizes a one-day cultural accelerator to explore what’s next for spatial design. 'The Next Space' is an iterative think-tank that results in a whitepaper that redefines how we conceive, inhabit and make use of space across key sectors. Attendees formulate new concepts aimed at increasing human wellbeing while reducing impact on the planet. The event’s ambition is to compile a set of guidelines for the future of spatial design within a 5-year period.

October 21 | Sustainable urban food systems | Eindhoven

During the event, four keynote speakers bring attendees up to speed on the most relevant developments within tech, materials, food and mobility, and how these trends will impact spatial design. At 13:00, our Scientific Director, Eveline van Leeuwen, hosts one of these keynotes focussed on the topic of sustainable urban food systems.

“When we look at how design impacts the development of a resilient urban food system, there are three elements we need consider all together. Namely, how to produce food 1) for the city, 2) with the city and 3) in the city.”

Eveline van Leeuwen

Scientific Director

After each talk, participants will discuss these insights in a one-hour make-a-thon in breakout spaces related to spatial design’s four main sectors: retail, urbanism, work and living. These working sessions offer an unprecedented opportunity for thought leaders from different disciplines to meet and inspire one other, culminating in partnerships that can radically change how we think about The Next Space.

As said before, the event’s ambition is to compile a set of guidelines for the future of spatial design within a 5-year period. Want to be part of this exciting journey? Sign up here >>